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Coffee

Entering the Belgian coffee market

Belgium sourced 98% of its imports in 2018 directly from producing countries. The three main green coffee suppliers were Brazil, Vietnam and Honduras, accounting for about 58% of total supplies. The increasing interest in high-quality and certified coffees in Belgium underlines the growing importance of origin, traceability and social impact of coffee. This makes storytelling an increasingly important aspect for every actor along the value chain in the coffee sector.


Entering the Italian market for coffee

Italy sourced 97% of its imports in 2018 directly from producing countries. The three main green coffee supplying countries were Brazil, Vietnam and India, accounting for about 64% of total supplies. Although the market for specialty coffees is still a very small niche market in Italy, it brings interesting opportunities for exporters of high-quality coffees from special origins with unique stories.


Entering the German coffee market

Sustainability is increasingly important in the German coffee market. Within Europe, Germany is the largest organic coffee market, offering wide opportunities for organic coffee. Therefore, organic certification can be an interesting proposition for coffee exporters. However, as an exporter you will also encounter a competitive market that is the prime destination for producers of organic-certified coffee.


The German market potential for coffee

Germany is Europe’s largest importer of green coffee beans. Its coffee roasting industry is enormous, serving both its domestic market — the largest in Europe — and exports markets. Sustainability commitments for coffee are increasingly important in the German coffee market, where specialty coffee is growing and taking on larger market shares.


Exporting coffee to Germany

Germany is Europe’s largest importer of green coffee beans. The German coffee roasting industry is enormous, serving both its domestic coffee market — the largest in Europe — and exports markets. Sustainability commitments are increasingly important in the German coffee market, where specialty coffee is growing and taking on larger market shares. Organic certification can be interesting for coffee exporters targeting the German coffee market, which is continuously growing.

African Fine Coffee Conference & Exhibition

During the 18th African Fine Coffee Conference & Exhibition, CBI has been invited by Markup, EU-EAC Market Access Upgrade Programme to make a presentation and be part of a panel discussion during the plenary debate: “Coffee Industry Talks. Industry leaders share key industry trends, regulations and practices” with participants. During this event, we shall also have our market researcher Profound, Mrs Lisanne Groothuis presenting our Market Intelligence Market Entry study during the business clinics: “Buyer negotiations and expectations”.

Exporting coffee to Italy

Italy is the second-largest importer of green coffee beans in Europe, after Germany. Brazil, Vietnam and India are Italy’s main coffee suppliers, accounting for approximately 64% of Italian coffee imports. Coffee is an integral part of Italian culture. The market for specialty coffees is still a very small niche market in Italy, but it brings interesting opportunities for exporters of high-quality coffees from special origins with unique stories.

Exporting coffee to Belgium

Belgium is one of the main points of entry and trade hubs for coffee in Europe. It is also an increasingly interesting market for certified coffees, following a consumer trend towards sustainable, traceable and high-quality products. The specialty coffee market in Belgium is also growing while maintaining the country’s tradition for small coffee houses and cafés. The growing interest in high-quality and certified coffees in Belgium underlines the growing importance of origin, traceability and social impact in coffee.

Entering the Eastern European coffee market

The Eastern European coffee market is dominated by international companies offering their own coffee brands. Slowly, however, the specialty market in Eastern Europe opens up doors for exporters of high-quality coffees. In spite of still being a very small niche market, the growing interest in specialty coffees creates opportunities for more direct relationships between specialised coffee roasters and coffee exporters.


The Eastern European market potential for coffee

Direct coffee imports from Eastern European countries remain relatively low, but the region’s overall coffee import volumes are on the rise. Rising incomes and growing interest in high-quality coffees also bring interesting opportunities to the Eastern European coffee market. Specialised small coffee roasters are rapidly rising, especially in Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania, in a market that is still dominated by multinationals and mainstream brands.


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